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Archivio Gennaio 2006

Interview with Yaiva

15 Gennaio 2006 1 commento


A little history of Yaiva
I’ve been know simply as Yaiva since I was real young. Yaiva is my last name which is from the American Indian Tribe, Hopi and means to rise gracefully. I been rhyming for a minute now and doing shows professionally for 8 years, living off this music and loving it. We?ve done tons of shows all across the United Snakes and live shows are our main motivation, it is what I enjoy most about doing music and being able to feed my family off of what I love is even better. We?ve opened for legends like the Geto Boys, 2 live Crew, Digital Underground, Damien Marley, The Neville Brothers, Mix Master Mike, Kid Frost, N2Deep and have done shows in Canada, the west coast to the east coast and have been nominated for a Native American Music Award.

This is your first cd? This is actually my 3rd cd. My first cd is currently still Arizona?s best selling indie album and we released it 3 years ago, our people show us love and I love them for that. This current cd is the one nominated for the Music award though.

Tell me something about hip-hop in your city.
Hip hop in my city is very diverse. I live in a small city in Northern Arizona where there is a lot of conscious movements. So when you come to a hip hop show here it is usually conscious but everything here intertwines and makes it real interesting, many people come here and don?t want to leave cuz of the positive vibe we got up here at 7000 feet in elevation, were up in the mountains. Another aspect of our diversity is the ethnicity of the peoples and how we pretty much all get along, those of like minds, plus we got a huge Native American population how practice tradition, language and teachings, which gets mix into our hip hop and makes it that much more diverse, there is nothing like this in the world, believe that.

Do you know something about hip-hop in Italy?
A little, I got some beats from a cat out there a few years ago, he told me bout the dope culture yall got out there and how it is more cultured then even here in the US. The hip hop on the mainstream here in the US is nonsense with talk of glitz and glamour, bitches, hoes and money, where as he told me of the essence that is kept strong despite commercial influences.

What do you think about mp3?
MP3 is dope, cuz before we could only get heard in live shows and cd?s but now we have our music on about 15 different sites where folks can download and listen on line, it has taken our music around the world and back, it is a dope promotional tool.

And about women in hip-hop?
I think women in hip hop are much needed. I don?t know too many female emcees out here but I do know a couple. I did a track with a lady name manzaneta fire, she was so cool, gifted and beautiful. The track we did was called Red Chilli, on some live emcee vibe but don?t know of too many others in my area, but I know they are a needed aspect in hip hop to balance the game. In native culture we teach of balance and roles of males and females which need not to be overlooked, plus in many native culture women are the ones with the most powerful voices.

Have you performed live?
All the time, at least 6 ? 7 times a month about 100 shows a year.

Who is the artist you like most and why?
Chuck D of Public Enemy. Because he is intelligent, conscious and did things for his people and made some crazy moves as an artist, got mad respect for him and would like to meet him and open for Public Enemy one day.

Do you think that hip-hop videos represent the real hip-hop?
No not at all. I think videos plant a false seed in the minds on watchers who many times don?t question what they see and hear.

In which way you live hip-hop?
I live it I breathe it, like KRS said, I am hip hop.

Tell me something about clubs and radios in your city.
We rock a majority of the clubs here and each asa a different vibe. One is more mainstream and is opened to all ages the other is more underground and is 21 and over, the latter has the best sound and stage in our city, I think personally. The radio don?t show us no love but its okay, but the Native American stations show us love and play us at more then 60 stations through out the US and Canada.

Future projects
I got a compliation dropping in a month called The Winter Solstice, were on some revolutionary/make moves for the people type of vibe with some of the best in Native music featured, come check the link www.4went.com/save.html for more info. were supporting a great cause with this one and standing up for native people and our beliefs.
The other is my next solo album which is a mixture of political, conscious joints and more diverse joints, some of the best shit to date. Its called For The People but were waiting for the results of the Music awards to drop it. Also we have 3 mini tours in the next couple months and doing a huge New Years Eve party in Nevada.

13) Thanks and hello to my people who have supported and continue to support. The people who love and support diverse hip hop, my moms, my wife, Somana, my daughter Sonakih, my son Lomanaqwa, my aunt Sally, my friends, family in the struggle with me, all the fans and the indigenous peoples of the world.

14) for contacts?
www.4went.com
Yaiva@4went.com
www.myspace.com/4went

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Interview with MBF

15 Gennaio 2006 Commenti chiusi


A little history of MBF
I began rapping in 1987 at the age of 8. I became serious with the music in 1991, but I didn?t start marketing myself until 1998. I began using the name MBF, which stands for Mind Blowing Finatic, in 1994. Before then, I was rapping under the name Jayski, then Rage. However there was an artist signed to Death Row at the time named Lady of Rage, so I changed the name to MBF

This is your first cd?
Carry On Tradition is actually my fourth completed cd, but it can be considered my first in the eyes of the public because it is the first that is getting any real recognition. This is actually a part 2 to a cd I put out in 2003 called Upstart Mix Tape.

Tell me something about hip-hop in your city.
Well, I?m from Brooklyn, New York and New York is the birth place of Hip Hop, so the scene is thriving. It?s a very competitive atmosphere because NY is where the majority of the major music labels are, so everyone is trying to get signed. There are plenty of outlets for underground artists such as showcases and college radio so it?s cool.

Do you know something about hip-hop in Italy?
I don?t know of any specific artists coming out of Italy, but I do know that Hip Hop is universal. Its popularity goes beyond the United States. I know that the international audience supports Hip Hop way more than statewide.

What do you think about mp3?
I think it?s an excellent way to get your music heard. I don?t support illegal downloading, but I believe hearing samples of music help the consumer decide if they want to spend their money on an entire album. In terms of unsigned artists, it helps get music to different people faster than sending a CD snail mail.

And about women in hip-hop?
I love it when I see a woman able to flow and hold her own on the microphone. I don?t discriminate. If you got skills I?ll give you props. It?s funny, me being too scared to rap for MC Lyte made me take rapping seriously.

Have you performed live?
Yes. I have performed in many different cities in the U.S. I call it ?spur of the moment? tours because it?s nothing for me to jump in my car and drive to Baltimore or Atlanta to perform. That?s why I shout my car out so much in my rhymes. It?s been through a lot.

Who is the artist you like most and why?
My influences range from Big Daddy Kane to A Tribe Called Quest. If I had to say current artists, it would be The Roots and Common. Both of these acts don?t compromise their artistry to sell records. They make music according to how they feel. It?s for the love of Hip Hop and that?s what I believe it should be all about. Shout out to Kanye West, too.

Do you think that hip-hop videos represent the real hip-hop?
The video is a strong medium. It?s a great way to promote your music. For the most part videos don?t really represent real Hip Hop. They are all the same bikini clad women and club scenes. Though I like the visuals I am seeing from Southern rap artists, but there is no imagination right now.

In which way you live hip-hop?
I live Hip Hop in the clothes I wear, the music I listen to, the way I speak to my peers. I take in Hip Hop and it allows me to create my own style.

Tell me something about clubs and radios in your city.
Well, Hip Hop is played on two major stations in New York. You have WQHT Hot 97 and Power 105.1 The radio personalities on there are also DJ?s in various nightclubs, so Hip Hop is prevalent all over the city. Shout out to Funk Master Flex and Tat Wza who gave back to the unsigned community through their mix tape and DVD series. There are planty of college DJ?s giving underground artists a chance and there are plenty of clubs such as The Remote Lounge and The Pyramid that give showcases for unsigned artists.

Future projects
I am re-releasing my current cd Upstart 2: Carry On Tradition with new versions of current tracks and adding another cd with the best of my past music. I?m trying to get all my material out to the public and see what happens. I am also working on developing my own magazine and finishing a screenplay that I hope to get released in the next couple of years.

Thanks and hello to
My wife Tracy-Ann for all the support. My whole family, my producer Big POPE, DJ Slim, unsignedhype.org, dj izm, rap fanatic magazine, DJ Tat Wza, Funk Master Flex, The WonderTwinz, J Hatch, Drawzilla, Bedtyme 357, JF, Mann of 1 Famlee, my best friends BJ and Junior, everyone who supports my music. Special shout out to you Ciobin and your whole staff for having me for this interview.

for contacts?
To get in contact with me you can text message me at 3475124535. You can e-mail me at jaylover78@aol.com, or hit up my websites www.mb2daf.com . to hear music go to www.soundclick.com/mbf .

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Interview with Justin Happ G

15 Gennaio 2006 Commenti chiusi


A little history of The Hogan Fam
The Hogan Fam thing was a compilation I put together a couple years ago involving a lot of Philly underground talent. I dropped and EP on vinyl and a full length on cd. The project featured 40th Dimension, Reef the Lost Cauze, Louis Logic, Jake Lefco, Snuff, Uncle T, Kenneth Masters, Briz, Adam 12, Fowlmowf, Scandal of 40d, The Flight Brothers,
Luce Leif, O-D-D, J.J. Brown, Greedy Gretch, Starvin Marvin, and many more.

This is your first cd?
“Karma Response Unit presents The Hogan Fam” is my label’s 4th CD release. We’ve also dropped 40th Dimension’s “Super Scandalous” maxi single, 40D’s “The Crop Report” full length, and Snuff’s “The D.S.O.D. (Drunk Spaniard On Deck) on CD. And on vinyl we’ve dropped 40th Dimension’s “Super Scandalous” 12 single”, 40D’s “Zip It” 12″ single,
40D’s “The Crop Report” 2LP, Kenneth Masters’ “Independent As Fu*k!” 12″ single (co-released with Arrakis Records), “The Hogan Fam EP” 12″ single, Dr. Noh “Contra-Diction” 12″ single, and Snuff’s “Countdown” 12″ single,

Tell me something about hip-hop in your city.
Philadelphia has so much talent it’s crazy! There’s really the makings of an amazing music scene in Philly, and there always has been a great musical tradition with this city. But there often seems to be a lack of support issue, where Philly heads don’t show love to Philly artists as much as they should. It’s such a competitive place that sometimes the support just doesn’t seem to be there. Philly kind of sits in the shadow of New York City, so we collectively have a chip on our shoulder attitude I believe. But there’s so much good music being created in Philadelphia it’s ridiculous!….And a lot of bad music as well, but that comes with the territory.

Do you know something about hip-hop in Italy?
Not at all, but I’d like to find out about it. I would wonder if the majority of Italian emcees rhyme in Italian or in English or a mix of both?

What do you think about mp3?
I think mp3s and websites like myspace and file sharing sites are great for the independent artists and labels trying to really make a name for themselves, but I can understand why it’s not so good for Metallica. mp3s and file sharing have major record labels reeling. And indie labels too. Just in general it’s a hard time to be a record label, but I think that mp3s and file sharing are more useful to the independent artist trying to gain some rep, but can be very hurtful for
established acts where it directly hampers their record sales.

And about women in hip-hop?
I’m all for it. I love hearing an ill female emcee or seeing a bgirl do some crazy moves. I’ve always been a huge fan of Bahamadia and I loved Boss’ “Deeper”, that song was my shit! And of course you can’t deny the female voices of Queen Latifah, MC Lyte, Monie Love, Salt N Pepa, Ladybug Mecca, to nowadays’ Jean Grae, Eternia, Invincible, and so many more doing their thing. It all boils down to one thing for me, if it’s dope music it’s dope music! It doesn’t matter black, white, green, purple, man, woman, donkey, if it’s good music it’s good music.

Have you performed live?
As one half of the duo 40th Dimension, I’ve performed many times. We’ve done shows with Mr. Lif, All Natural, MF Doom, Cee Knowledge (Doodlebug of Digable Planets), Virtuoso, Rahzel, Reef the Lost Cauze, Dave Ghetto and Fel Sweetenberg, Jake Lefco, Snuff, Eric Bazilian (of the Hooters), and many more. I’ve done many regional shows in the Philly area and NYC area, and a few times ventured to Montreal and Chicago for shows.

Who is the artist you like most and why?
I have trouble picking favorites of anything, but if I had to pick ONE artist I most like, I’d probably have to go with Bob Marley, because his message is so universal and honest and essential. His music is like an old friend who you can always relate to.

Do you think that hip-hop videos represent the real hip-hop?
Some do, but not the majority of the ones they show all time on MTV and BET. You gotta dig really hard or stay up really late to catch the real shit.

In which way you live hip-hop?
I run my record label with a pure hip hop mentality, just trying to come with flavor and bring something new and original to the table and not just be another clone of what’s out there. And I try to be as creative as well as a producer.

Tell me something about clubs and radios in your city.
I’m a home body and I rarely make it out to the clubs, unless I’m going to a show, so I can’t give you an honest answer about that. And I can tell you that the radio in my city is pretty wack for hip hop. I mostly listen to the oldies and classic rock stations.

Future projects
Karma Response Unit Records is dropping a 12″ single by Jake Lefco in early Feb. followed immediately by two albums, “And You Are?” and “Missing Trooth” dropping in April and May respectively. There’s more stuff in the burner after that, but nothing set in stone enough yet to talk about. I don’t like to jinx things by talking about them too early before they really happen.

Thanks and hello to
Thanks to everyone who listens, the love of my life Aimee, Jake Lefco, Reef the Lost Cauze, Scandal, and Snuffy and the rest of my family and friends.

Check out the site www.krurecords.com and can also check us out and download and listen to free goodies at;

www.myspace.com/karmaresponse
www.myspace.com/jakelefco
www.myspace.com/happgeez
www.myspace.com/40thdimension

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Interview with JLogic

15 Gennaio 2006 Commenti chiusi


A little history of Jlogic
Whattup, I’m JLOGIC, spelt all caps, no hyphen hah.. I’m from Long Island, New York, home of some of the greats like Rakim, EPMD, De La Soul and many more. I started emceeing six years ago when I was 16 years old and making beats three years ago. I work at the world famous Fat Beats Record Store in New York City with DJ Eclipse of Non Phixion, Maticulous, DJ Element, DJ Dary Stroup and Citizen Vein of Kill World (my group). I’m the head of marketing for the upcoming hiphop gear company: Dirty Waters, our debut clothing line will be coming out next month in 2006.

Is this your first cd?
Yes, we’ve been hard at work piecing together the Kill World album since early 2005. Kill World consists of myself, Citizen Vein, Mage & Hi-Q. We were originally set to release our first album, entitled Inertia, a little over a year ago, but after we recorded ”Controversy Rap” with our good friend Sabac Red of Non Phixion, we decided to scrap all of the songs for the Inertia album and start fresh with the ”Controversy Rap” track, and we are really putting together something original/innovative/raw, something hip hop’s been missing, with the exception of a handful or groups/artists.

Tell me something about hip-hop in your city.
Hip Hop in New York City is always thriving and is definitely still the city that gave birth to hip hop and the culture, but there are alot of cities throughout the world that are really creating their own trends/styles/vibes and that is something that will keep hip hop alive. The scene on Long Island is dope as usual, the Cop Shop, run by my boy E-Nyce, is THE PULSE of the Long Island hip hop scene, which is consistantly growing today.

Do you know something about hip-hop in Italy?
I’ve been listening to alot of Italian hip hop for the past year, my boys Freddie De Santes (Italian Pro Skateboarder) and M.A.S.S.Y (Italian Graffiti legend) have been gettin me on to some really really dope Italian hip hop from their country, I’m definitely going to set up a tour for Kill World sometime soon, we all want to come out there ASAP.

What do you think about mp3?
Mp3′s are like anything else that has to do with the internet, there’s the good and the bad. The good: They make making music easier in a lot of ways and the sound quality is crystal clear a majority of the time. The bad: Bootlegging is slowly but steadily killing music in general, it’s actually destroying the foundation of music; which is making music for the fans, but if there are no fans supporting, alot of people are making music to make money and that could inevitably lead to the demise of hip hop BUT I highly doubt that will happen because there are still real ”artists” like my crew out there that are doing this because they love it and will still find a way to survive without having to comprimise their sound just to make money.

And about women in hip-hop?
Women in hip hop are a great thing. I want to start out by saying Peace to my sister Amore of INT Productions, she IS hip hop. B-Girls, female DJ’s, emcee’s and graff writers are hip hop and they are the shit because most of them have more love for the culture than some dudes these days.

Have you performed live?
I’ve performed live in alot of the USA’s dopest cities on the east coast. With either Kill World or The Ice Age (Me and Hi-Q’s side-project) I’ve performed in Boston, Hartford, Baltimore, Oneonta, and ofcourse New York City and Long Island. I’ve been performing since 2001. Kill World (formerly TNK) actually performed in New York City every week for a year straight in 2004.

Who is the artist you like most and why?
That’s a tough call because there are probably 5 or 6 artists that I like most for different reasons. But overally I’d probably say, Masta Ace. Masta Ace is the epitome of an emcee/lyricist. He is THE MOST evolved emcee of all time. You could listen to The Slaughterhouse today from beginning to end and it is still dope to today’s standards eventhough its old skool, it’s timeless. Then you could put on A Long Hot Summer and listen to it from beginning to end, which is crazy to me because he sounds like two completely different emcee’s on those two albums, he really evolved incredibly and artistically; he’s a fuckin’ living legend.

Do you think that hip-hop videos represent the real hip-hop?
These days I’d say that most commercial hip hop videos are not hip hop, they are rap. They depict the things that these rappers are talking about; girls, money, cristal, cars with candy paint, their mansions and ofcourse ”the club.” Every once in a long while you will see a real hip hop video from these commercial rappers, I feel like Nas is probably the only one to do that, but then again, he’s an emcee/lyricist, not a ‘rapper.’

In which way you live hip-hop?
I live hip hop everyday. From the gear that I rock to my obession with disecting the music. It’s all I talk about, it’s alot of what I listen to, it’s my life and it’s been that way for almost a decade. My life for the past year and a half has been paying dues; a LONG/TIRING commute to New York City to work at the dopest record store in the world, Fat Beats New York.

Tell me something about clubs and radios in your city.
I don’t go to clubs because I’m broke and I’m not a metrosexual, although it’s cool to go with my girlfriend and friends to celebrate someone’s birthday every once in a while, but as far as hip hop clubs/venues, New York City is the shit. Places like the Knitting Factory, S.O.B.’s, BB Kings, Bowery Ballroom, Hammerstein Ballroom and the Bowery Poetry Club are really keeping the hip hop scene alive by bringing in dope well-known artists and having their fans actually participate in living the culture by attending a hip hop show, its great. NYC’s radio stations play club shit which is wack but there are some dope shows like Future Flava’s with my man DJ Evil Dee, that play this thing called RAW HIP HOP. Also, I like DJ Absolut and Green Lantern’s shows, they play good hip hop too.

Future projects
Future projects? I have alot of ideas and plans and I’m going to keep my mouth closed until things actually go down and the CD or LP is in your hands…but believe me, I have alot to say and do, plus there’s alot that I want to bring to hip hop in the very near future.

Thanks and hello to
I want to say whattup to my girl Michele aka Stunnette Da Queen, my brothers Kill World/TNK, My sister Jenna, ZAMS 1er, M-Swift, CaTH of ACA, the whole Fat Beats Family, ABACUS, Critical Madness, Marco Polo, Sabac Red, Goretex, Mars Oner, DJ Skizz, Little Vic, C-Rayz Walz, my boy Tom from Myspace.com, VEX, my NGC brothers and all my fam! If I forgot you then go to www.myspace.com/jlogicny and yell at me…and listen to my music…

If you want to get at me go to; www.TNKhiphop.com, www.myspace.com/jlogicny, www.myspace.com/killworld, or hit me up on AIM at Elements2000. KILL WORLD 2006.

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Interview with Identical

15 Gennaio 2006 Commenti chiusi


A little history of Identical
Well IDENTICAL started from birth because because we are infact identical twin brothers but we been puttin down this music grind since around 92-93 before we where 10 years old. We use to be called the Hostile Assassins but we cahnged that a few years ago to IDENTICAL because it was a better look for us.

This is your first cd?
No, Our 1st album was “Stash Fada Drought” but, this is our 1st one with a bar code that we are pushing. The last 1 was more “mixtape” style

Tell me something about hip-hop in your city.
It’s alot of People in INKSTER MICHIGAN that’s rapping but, right now we ARE the city, we are laying the ground work for a successful career. We the 1st rap group in INKSTER MI to ever grace the cover of a magazine(www.tracksandbars.com)

Do you know something about hip-hop in Italy?
No not at all but hopefully Italy will find out about IDENTICAL and we will find out about Italy.

What do you think about mp3?
I love tha fact that mp3′s exsist because it’s helping us obtain radio play all around the world.

And about women in hip-hop?
I think it’s great hip hop isnt just for men, it’s a life style so women in it is cool with me, my sister (Lo-Key) is one of the best I ever heard.

Have you performed live?
Yeah we been rocking crowds since we started that was actually our introduction to the game, but now we want to start rocking large crowds all over the world.

Who is the artist you like most and why?
We like to many people to name, but we really like the independent artist the most.

Do you think that hip-hop videos represent the real hip-hop?
No it’s giving little kids the impression that everyone is rich when in fact that is not true.

In which way you live hip-hop?
We don’t just live “hip-hop” we Gangstas with a purpose to restore ghettos across the world and show that no matter where you from that we can all relate with each other thru music and entertainment.

Tell me something about clubs and radios in your city.
Well we live in a very small city so it’s like 1 club (stardust lounge) and we rock that when ever we in the house and as far as radio it’s 2 major radio stations but we go the college and internet route for the time being because it’s less politics.

Future projects
In 2006 were going to be working on our short film “THINK P.A.I.D.” and soundtrack and our next album so be on the look out for those projects.
Thanks and hello to
We would like to thank you for giving us this international stage and also our lord and savior for making this all possible and the readers for taking out the time to check us out. Oh yeah FREE my dog Mr. Rain. The readers can write him and the ladies can send him pics in jail at CHAUNCEY JACKSON #47732
8585 n.Crowell rd
St. Louis Correctional facility
St. Louis MI 48880
besure to let him know that IDENTICAL gave yall the address he will love to here that we grinding internationally.

For contacts?
You can cop that new album “Welcome ta…Inksta” at www.cdbaby.com/identical and you can here our music online and contact us at www.myspace.com/identical22 (besure to read the blogs for updates and news/reviews etc.)

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Interview with 857

15 Gennaio 2006 Commenti chiusi


A little history of 857
857 has been together recording music since 2000. Our purpose is to create music that goes against many of the mainstream trends that currently dominate the industry. We?re trying to stimulate more creativity, originality, and variety which is seriously lacking in hip-hop. Even though we have artists like Kanye West, Common, Talib Kweli and the Black Eyed Peas, most labels still jump on the gansta bandwagon and continue to only promote the thug image. This makes it difficult for artists with more abstract styles of hip-hop to get exposure so we?re trying to change that condition.

This is your first cd?
Yeah, technically speaking. We have distributed other projects (underground stuff) before Stand Out, but Stand Out can be considered our first professionally published CD.

Tell me something about hip-hop in your city.
As far as Long Island is concerned, there?s not a lot of love for new emerging hip-hop acts, you really do have to hustle at it. The hip-hop scene is pretty much close to non-existent as far as venues are concerned, not many allow hip-hop to be performed. We?re close to New York City, where there are some g venues but for the unsigned artist, it?s still always a challenge getting into them. It?s also frustrating that most of the ones that offer showcases charge insane fees $150-$250 to perform 2 songs in front of non-existent anonymous-major label attendants. It?s really sickening how most of these promoters profit from people?s dreams. But we?ve grown wiser then we were when we first started performing, so I guess you can consider it a learning experience.

Do you know something about hip-hop in Italy?
We don?t know much about hip-hop in Italy specifically, but we do understand that hip-hop artists whose expressions are most similar to ours (like De La Soul, and Black Eyed Peas, etc.) seem to be more easily accepted by the European audience in general. So that?s definitely a positive.

What do you think about mp3?
I think they?re great actually. They?re easier to send then a bulky CD. Anything digital that helps exposure is really a blessing. They make everything cheaper and more convenient. I feel that CDs will go out of style sooner or later anyway, much like how DVD players have replaced VCRs.

And about women in hip-hop?
It?s pretty bad for women actually. We?re still in the Lil? Kim and Foxy Brown generation. It seems that the industry usually signs female rappers who have some kind of sex appeal and whose content is usually centered around sex or rauncy depictions of it. It?s messed up to because we?ve come across several female hip-hops acts (unsigned) that are very talented. But they aren?t of the cookie cutter formula that the industry likes to practice.

Have you performed live?
Oh yeah. 857 has performed in clubs, bars, festivals, colleges and on live television and internet television. We’re pretty experienced.

Who is the artist you like most and why?
Despite the fact that 857 is displeased with the rap game currently there are a quite a few artists we do like. Among those I?ll mention Black Eyed Peas, De La Soul, Will Smith and Kanye West. The first 3 I mentioned especially, because they have each been in hip-hop for a long time, believed in themselves, still make music and never changed they?re style no matter how much the industry chooses to promote only gansta rap and the traditional thug, ex-con image. Their styles may have evolved like every other talented artist, but they?ve never conformed and for that we considered them huge inspirations.

Do you think that hip-hop videos represent the real hip-hop?
Most of?em, no. Most videos are like a huge commercials for car dealerships, diamond distributors, and brand name clothing lines. The eye candy (half naked women) may look nice, but it?s not necessary of EVERY hip-hop video. Besides, portraying that type image so often limits the creativity that could come from future videos when everyone chooses to jump on the bandwagon. Also, it doesn’t do anything positive for the image of females, especially minorities, in America.

In which way you live hip-hop?
If you truly love hip-hop it?s something you live 24/7. There really isn?t a day we don?t think about ideas for new songs or anything related to our music. Our songs are varied and are really about things you come across in life so the inspiration can come from anywhere. So what we live and experience goes in our music, which can be seen from the amount of character and personality displayed from it. You feel the love for the music and that’s why you do it.

Tell me something about clubs and radios in your city.
Where we live in Long Island there aren?t many clubs that feature hip-hop showcases. In New York City there are some pretty good ones, but again the same issues exist that I described above.
Since I don?t like hip-hop?s current direction, I honestly don?t listen to commercial radio that much. Everytime I do I can only stand to hear it for maybe 4 songs before I turn it off. I have a very open ear but the radio plays a lot of bad rap music. Thank god for ipods.

Future projects.
We?re currently recording our next album the Joke?s Over and that should be available for sale in 2006 (early to 1st half). Other than that we?re going to be doing a video for ?Where?s the Beef?? on the Stand Out album and have other things lined up.

Thanks and hello to
All our fans and family for the support so far and everyone who logs to www.857music.com

for contacts:
GQ Management
Frank Aiello
P.O. Box 342
Williston Park, NY 11596
Phone # – (516) 924-0719

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