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Archivio Febbraio 2004

Interview with The Ground

26 Febbraio 2004 Commenti chiusi

THE GROUND
By Ciobin

CIOBIN: A little history of The Ground(formerly Common Ground)
JC: We started as a 3 man crew back in college. DJ Heavy introduced Jayem
and I at the weekly radio show he was doing. There was an immediate
connection and we soon started performing around the campus with local
bands, open mics, competitions, etc. Once we graduated, we wanted to keep it
moving and go on to the more professional side of the game. We linked with
some of
Detroit’s top porducers, started writting songs instead of just verses, and
started hittin up the studio regualrly. Soon we had our first few songs
complete. I had been saving some coin from my new engineering job, so I took
that cash and put out our first 12inch. Landspeed helped get it around the
globe. We got some shows from it and soon released a follow up single and a
6
song cd. Just before the release of this latest 12inch, DJ Heavy felt it was
time to move on. WE then shortened teh group name to THE GROUND. The “All We
Got” vinyl came out to start 2004 and thats where we stand now.

C: This is your first cd?
JC: Our first CD was “The Appetizer EP”. It was 5 songs from our first 2
vinyl singles and one bonus track. We made that so we had something for the
non-DJ’s and to hustle hand-to-hand. This is our first 12″ single with full
color cover, so this feels like our first “real” release.

C: Tell me something about hip-hop in your city.
Jayem: Well, it’s hard for me to define what I would consider my city.
Flint, Michigan is where I was born, raised and where my heart is.
Growing up, I did the whole battle thing and had a crew of MC’s that I
used to rhyme with. We recorded a slew of songs, but nothing ever came
out of it. When I left for college in 1994, I sort of lost touch with
the “hip hop community” in Flint. That’s the time I met JC, and all he
would talk about was the Detroit scene. That’s where we met the majority
of our producers. We were never the crew to claim a city. Overall, there
is certainly a lot of talent in Detroit, as well as a few crews holding
it down in Flint. We’ve always felt like outsiders to the whole “scene.”
I don’t think people know how to take us yet. We try to blend humor,
seriousness, consciousness (I hate to use that word), and a littlle
cockiness in our music. It’ shard to find a niche when you keep changing
your style, but change is natural.

C: Do you know something about hip-hop in Italy?
JC: Not a thing. Looking to get to Europe in 2004 and see whats up.
Jayem: I’m sure it’s strong, because hip hop is so universal. I’m very
curious.

C: What do you think about mp3?
Jayem: I’m cool with it. Whatever it takes to get the music to the people.
JC: Gotta find the good in it and use it to your benefit. MP3 aint going
away any time soon.

C: And about women in hip-hop?
JC:Women can shine in any arena. Hiphop definitely benefits from a dose of
feminine energy. All these arrogant males with diarrhea of the lips might
change thier tone with more women on the microphone. Usually though, the
women try to fit the masculine mold, losing their own identity, and I aint
feelin that overall.
Jayem: I miss Lauryn Hill’s presence in hip hop. I like when women, or any
person for that matter, bring individuality to the music. Women are
beautiful when they are confident, and L. Boogie’s confidence was so
attractive to me.

C: Have you performed live?
JC: Oh yeah. Since we got together in college we went from coffee houses and
battle of the bands type gigs to full size stages in Detroit, Chicago, and
Toronto. Live is how it started for us as a group cause we started doing a
live radio show. Now its all for the record.

C: Who is the artist you like most and why?
Jayem: You ready? Frank Sinatra! He lived for the music and redifined his
genre. He was so convincing when he was on stage. I also like how he could
write/sing about anything and it sounded dope. “That’s Life,” “My Way,”
“Fly Me to the Moon,” those are my last call jukebox songs, right there! I
would have to add Al Green, and early Rakim to that list. Recently, Jay-Z
has been ridiculous! He kills everything he touches.

C: Do you think that hip-hop videos represent the real hip-hop?
Jayem: Of course not. A video is so expensive that it must appeal to
the people who buy music. The majority of those people seem to be
fickle; therefore, artists have to appeal to what is hot at the time.
Honestly, how many “timeless” hip hop videos have there ever been? Not
many. It’ s nobodys fault, it’s just the nature of the beast.

C: In which way you live hip-hop?
JC: Its just me. I could be all dressed up workin with the big money
executives all day and still spit more slang than a gang of dudes with
twisted fitted’s. I dont need to try anymore. No more lookin for open mics,
shows, cyphers. I’m 26 this year with a house, cars,record label, a family
that needs me, big boy bills and big boy responsibilities. Being the dopest
is no longer on the agenda. For me, its now all about sharin poems. I’m not
the dude with the camoflage, backpack, headphones, scully, grimmin everyone
while I spit the hardest verses to my self in the dark corner of the bar. I
wore his boots and his attitude still spills outta my mouth while I wear in
these kicks. Gowin up is dope too, maturity is needed in Hiphop right now.
Jayem: Ditto!

C: Tell me something about clubs and radios in your city.
JAYEM: Clubs and radios…hmnn. It’s extremely difficult for unsignrd groups
to get any radio play outside of late night hip hop mixes. As far as clubs,
I’m the shot and a beer type. I haven’t been to a club in a while, but I
know some spots in Flint whre you can get a Bud Lite bottle for 1 dollar at
happy hour!

C: Future projects
JC: This “All We Got” single has been our current focus. Lots to do from
getting beats, writting songs, recording, mixing, mastering, pressing,
getting distribution, promotions…. We have a bunch of songs in the works,
yet we really could use some new experienced producers to work with.
Finding beats is our constant speed bump.

C: Thanks and hello to
JC: Thanks to you for makin contact with us! Someone book us some shows in
Europe!

Check our site at www.InquisitiveRecords.com and our vinyl can be bought
on line at www.sandboxautomatic.com or through TRC distribution.

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Interview with Woo Child

26 Febbraio 2004 Commenti chiusi


WOO CHILD
By Ciobin

CIOBIN: A little history of Woo Child
WOO CHILD: Thats pretty vague, so you wanna know who is Woo Child in my own words? Id say Woo is a breath of fresh air amongst a lot of nothing in the industry. Woo is honest and a student of the craft, born and raised in the unlikely city of Flint, Michigan. Reppin the Dirty Mitten to the fullest, murderin mics since 1999. Real life emceein, no gimmicks, just life as I see it and experience it.

C: This is your first cd?
WC: Nah, I have another by the name of Bridge The Gap that was released by Angel Magic Music.

C: Tell me something about hip-hop in your city.
WC: In Flint, you have a lot of cats that sound like earlier acts that came out the city (The Dayton Family, Shoe String, Bootleg, MC Breed, etc.). Most of them cats is on some murder, murder, kill, kill type music, which I cant knock cause its what we see growin up here, it is what it is and its honest. You got some more lyrical Hip Hop comin out the city as well, but mostly gangsta music.

C: Do you know something about hip-hop in Italy?
WC: Id be lyin if I said I did. HahaWhen I get a chance to come out that way and rock some shows, Ill get a chance to see the culture first hand.

C: What do you think about mp3?
WC: It is what it is. Cats download MP3s off the net cause the industry inflated prices and put out wack music. The consumer been mad for a while, and this their way of fighting back. All I can do is try to put together a quality album that people want to support, and hopefully they will.

C: And about women in hip-hop?
WC: As far as what? Videos? I figure people wanna see it, certain women are willing to show it, so whats the problem? Who am I to judge them? As far as female Hip Hop artists, Ive been diggin Jean Grae for a minute, Bahamadia, my gurl Redbone, Apani B Fly, even Eve. I like a lot of different Hip Hop, being a woman dont change quality, ya dig.

C: Have you performed live?
WC: No question. Ive rocked shows all around the Midwest, and down into Georgia.

C: Who is the artist you like most and why?
WC: Besides myself…hahaRedman has got to be the illest emcee on the planet. He been that cat for me since I heardem on Headbanger wit EPMD. It was over for me then. Kid is just nasty on the mic. Flow, cadence, lyrics, he got it all.

C: Do you think that hip-hop videos represent the real hip-hop?
WC: Whos to say what real Hip Hop is? Videos are just another way to market your music, nothing more, nothing less. I dont pay much attention to the TV anyways.

C: In which ways do you live hip-hop?
WC: Id have to say I live and breathe Hip Hop. From the way I walk, the way I talk, the way I dress, I keep it Hip Hop. I dont know what Id do with out my music. I can remember back in college, I was known as the cat wit the headphones cause you couldnt catch me withoutem. No matter what, I had my headphones. In class, walking to class, meeting with professors. It was my way to escape my surroundings, and touch wit home.

C: Tell me something about clubs and radios in your city.
WC: Clubs in my city are dangeroushaha. They get shot up every other week. But cats keep coming back and they keep closing up and reopening. Its crazy. The radios station, there used to be two that played Hip Hop, the first just switched to all R&B, the new one try and play all the hits, it gets monotonous. Most of the time people just tune into the Detroit stations. I stick to my CD collection.

C: Future projects
WC: Right now Im working on this Mixtape, Industry Takeover Im putting together with my fam. Big shout out to Asylum 7, NapsNDreds, Ness, Phatal Phenom for getting down on the project. Lookin to put out U.R.O.A. in the near future.

C: Thanks and hello to
WC: Thanks to my Mom for birthin me, and a big wut up to all the Hip Hop heads reading this joint. Holla @ the kid.

Get at me all day ereday @ www.WooChild.com . We got some hot things on the way, ya dig.

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Interview with Waajeed

19 Febbraio 2004 Commenti chiusi


WAAJEED
By Ciobin

CIOBIN: A little history of Jay Dee
W: Ive known Jay for over 15 years. He gave me my first drum machine the rest is history.

C: This is your first cd? Tell me something about Bling47
W: bling 47 is a production group, label, and movement.

C: Tell me something about hip-hop in your city.
W: To a point it speaks for itself. It is as diverse as the city itself. Detroit is known for hip hop, rock, dance music, soul music, and the hip hop scene reflects that . . . Eminem, Obie Trice, SV, Dwele etc. Its a diverse town. Hip hop in the D is about diversity.

C: Do you know something about hip-hop in Italy?
W: Very little. Id definitely like to know more and hear some stuff.

C: What do you think about mp3?
W: I have mixed feelings. I think that downloading is good from the standpoint that people have immediate access to music they want, but artists like myself that havent sold millions of records cannot eat and survive off our art form. I think it is the responsibility of people that download to buy a cd from the artist, or support that artist by visiting their website or going to their performances. Realistically, that will be the only way that music will survive.

C: And about women in hip-hop?
W: I dont think it is a level playing field for women in hip hop because of some of the roles that women take in hip hop. I think that it is the responsibility of women to not just take the Foxy and Lil Kim roles, but to also take the Lauryn Hill, Jean Grae, and Queen Latifah roles also. It is necessary to take those kinds of roles to counter some the ideas of women in hip hop and music in general. Part of what were trying to do is balance the equation and work with empowered . . . radicalized women like Invincible who is a female mc from Detroit, who was a regular on MTVs Lyricist Lounge Show and was also featured on Carl Craigs Detroit Experiment, who is politically and socially active on several levels, who believes in the power of her words rather than just the power of her sexuality.

C: Have you performed live?
W: Yes as a DJ with Slum Village and most recently as a DJ for Lacks and in the near future with my own group PPP. We will be starting our promotional tour in February in the UK. We will be following that up with an additional tour in June and hoping to touch down in a city near you.

C: Who is the artist you like most and why?
W: Right now, Earth, Wind, & Fire because of all the different ideas they combined with dance music almost made you forget that they were enlightening you while you sang along and clapped to the beat. Its like Goodie Mob because not only did you like the music, but they also had something valuable to say

C: Do you think that hip-hop videos represent the real hip-hop?
W: Absolutely not. I dont ever recall sitting in a pool with sunglasses, a big platinum chain, a doo rag on with 30 half-naked chicks. I think that hip hop videos are really the farthest thing from life and thats why people love them so much because it is a fabrication-it is a fantasy. Not to say that we dont strive for wealth and comfort, but maybe not as fictitious as that.

C: In which way you live hip-hop?
W: I live it everyday. Hip hop is truly a way of life a way to be, how you walk, how you rock your hat. I am hip hop. I live hip hop because it is not only my job, its my life its what I do from dusk til dawn, whether Im listening to music, making music . . . its how I eat and its how I live

C: Tell me something about clubs and radios in your city.
W: Clubs and radio in my city are progressive to some point, but they mainly play the same songs over and over. There are some clubs that are less trendy that play a wider variety of music and those are the ones I support

C: Future projects
W: The PPP album is the next major bling47 production. PPP consists of myself and my production partner Saadiq accompanied by rotating vocalists and mcs. We decided for this group that we did not want to feature one particular artist or mc because we do not want to limit ourselves to one sound or genre and would rather touch a lot of different facets of music. The album will be released through Ubiquity Records sometime in October and the featured artists will include Jay Dilla, of course, Theo Parrish, hopefully Elzhi from SV and a gang of other hot new artists. We really want this project to fuse together lots of different influences from hip hop, jazz, soul, and house music into a sort of hybrid.

C: Thanks and hello to
W: I would like to say thanks to Detroit and the b47 Staff, friends and family and most of all the bling 47 internet family-One Luv

For contacts
www.bling47.com

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Interview with Double A

19 Febbraio 2004 27 commenti


DOUBLE A
By Ciobin

CIOBIN: A little history of Double A
DOUBLE A: I was born and raised in East New York Brooklyn, I started rappin and performing at the age of 14. I started liken rap music the minute after hearin different types of rappers and rap groups such as Wu Tang Clan, Tupac Shakur, Nas, Nwa, Run Dmc, but I did not take it to heart until I bought my first rap album which was Dr Dre The Chronic which was released in 1992.

C: This is your first cd?
DA: To be real this is my first solo project I use to mainly do group projects with other local rappers around the hood however nothing really started to get off the ground with those projects so I finally decided to go out on my own and make things happen for myself.

C: Tell me something about hip-hop in your city.
DA: Hip Hop is the only way to live life down here. New York is the father of hip hop, I mean its like everyone and their mothers grand mother be rappin and listenin to hip hop. It dont matter where you at or where you go someone in New York has some sort of hip hop playin in their cd players or house or wherever the hell you can play hip hop.

C: Do you know something about hip-hop in Italy?
DA: Honestly I know hip hop has to be real big down there mainly because now and days hip hop has become the language for the entire world. I mean its like hip hop has done what many people could not do and that is bring together all sorts of races and cultures together. I only heard bits and pieces of Italian hip hop but I do want to experience it alot more because you never know were the next biggest rap star may come from, also I would love to hear what many people out there in Italy rap about.

C: What do you think about mp3?
DA: I think mp3 is the wave of the future for now, mainly because now and days some new type of technology is always being invented confusin the hell out of me as always but regardless I love it because with mp3 format you can download, store and play thousands of songs and not worry about how much space is being taken up on your computer or cd etc.

C: And about women in hip-hop?
DA: I love it when women rap. that ish turns me on because it shows me that women who are stereotyped by many but not all to be harmless as doves can be gangsta and aggressive when holdin down a song or a freestyle session . I think there should be more women rappin now and days because hip hop is too crazy for only us niggaz to be holdin it down. I mean think about it any track will sound flamein wit mad niggaz on it but you put a female emcee whos is good wit words on your track, that track will be bananas.

C: Have you performed live?
DA: Yea I performed in clubs, hotels, banquets, parties, roller skating rinks, and also churches!

C: Who is the artist you like most and why?
DA: Thats a tough choice to make but if I had to pick one out of like a million emcees I like I would have to say 2pac mainly because of his attitude and love towards hip hop. Now a days many people do not love hip hop, they just do it to see what they can gain from it. 2pac on the other hand loved it and you know he did anytime he rapped or performed.

C: Do you think that hip-hop videos represent the real hip-hop?
DA: It depends some videos do and some videos dont. To me its like politics some tell the truth and some dont so it depends who you are watching and who you are talking about.

C: In which way you live hip-hop?
DA: I eat, live, breath, and sleep hip hop. I mean there are times when my peoples tell me I need to relax because every time I go out or Im just relaxing I think of a song to write or think of some sort of idea to do a song with but not only that its also the way I dress, speak, and live the culture. Not to many people can do that.

C: Tell me something about clubs and radios in your city.
DA: The clubs is always crazy and they are always jumpin no matter what club you go to its nice. A lot of the clubs are like every other club drinks everywhere ladies dancing and niggaz tryin to get their hustle on you know. As for the radio its always crazy. You got Hot 97fm, Power 105.1, and WBLS 107.5

C: Future projects
DA: Right now Im workin on my solo album which is presently set to be released in june of 2004. The title of the album is not yet known because I want to give my album the title when Im done with it. im also managing local rappers from my hood, producing songs for people and also directing many projects for people who need that sound they are missing. I am also engineering and editing my project and other peoples projects as well at mad recording studios.

C: Thanks and hello to
DA: I wannna say whats hood to the LORD, Moms, Trini-Lee, Sister Millie Nephew Mat Bro Alex, Pops Carlos, Smooth, Alex Abrash, No Joke, Vizun, Exs, Sham, Top Shelf, Ron, Gudda Child, Booker T, Charlie Masters, The Oracle,, Evan, Angela, Melissa, Davon, Jason, Idi, James, God Built, Liz, Mike, Teresa, Paul, Maribel, Melissa, Kenny, Jay, J Meyer, Justin, Flori, Negrito, Patrick, Fred, Donald, Ricardo, Schemiz, Woza, Doreen, Cookie, Green Hundai, Vivian, Valencia, and to everyone who said I would die and never make it thank you I love you so much LMAO. (NOT AT YOU BUT WITH YOU)

For contacts
SMOOTH @ (973) 332 5153
Jay @ (646) 523 -5192/
(718) 348- 0980 /
doublea@itsdoublea.com

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Interview with Backstab the KingPin

19 Febbraio 2004 Commenti chiusi


BACKSTAB THE KINGPIN
By Ciobin

CIOBIN: A little history of Backstab The Kingpin
BACKSTAB: Former member of a group of rappers, singers, slanger’s and bangers, known as the Fenkell Avenue Players, Backstab the Kingpin, has fought his way to the forefront of the Detroit rap scene. His first solo project released in 2001entitled “BACKSTAB PROJECTS” has drawn national attention and critical acclaim. His first underground works (before the release of the Projects LP) got him major attention in Detroit 101, one of Murder Dog magazines most anticipated monthly articles. The KINGPIN LP and the FENKELL AVENUE PLAYERS self-titled debut EP were covered extensively in this issue. (Best of the best 119 most underrated artists in rap) But it wasn’t until his first retail ready, professional release that Backstab found some well-deserved fame. The Projects lp paved the wave for Stab to Host and headline such seminal shows as the 2002 Detroit hip-hop Awards, Heavyweights of Hip-hop, & the inaugural Detroitrap.com Showcase. Couple these historic local shows with opening for such legendary artists as
Slick Rick, 50 Cent, & Mc Breed, and you have historic proof that “The Kingpin” is one of Detroit’s hottest underground emcees. Backstab the Kingpin was voted Best New Artist of 2001 at the D.A.T. Detroit hip-hop Awards, as well as nominated for Outstanding hip-hop artist/group at the 2001 Detroit Music Awards. His record label, Fenkell Avenue Productions, was nominated for Outstanding Record label at the 2002 Detroit Music Awards. Throughout his underground tenure in the Detroit rap scene, Backstab has shared the stage with (unknown at the time) Eminem, Royce 5-9, Bizarre, Detroit’s Most Wanted, AWOL, SLUM VILLAGE & others.
Write-up’s, big up’s, & major props to Backstab include reviews, interviews & coverage in Metrotimes Magazine, Real Detroit Magazine, Murder Dog Magazine, www.rapreviews.com, the Detroit News, Detroit Free Press, Jam Rag Magazine, and MANY OVERSEAS HIP-HOP MAGAZINES.
This O.G. rapper from Detroit has just recently dropped his sophomore release entitled “BLOW ME”. This work features Brooklyn B-boy legend, Thirstin Howl III, and more production from Haze & Hush.
Be on the look out for the follow up to one of Detroit’s most classic records by one of Detroit’s most gifted emcee’s!

C: This is your first cd?
B: No, it is my second professional release.

C: Tell me something about hip-hop in your city.
B: Detroit is plagued with hate and envy. The rap scene is broken up into sectors. You have the psychopathic/Esham section, The D-12/Eminem section, and then you have we I call the “independent circut”. Its a cut throat scene. I have found more success and respect out of it.

C: Do you know something about hip-hop in Italy?
B: I know Italian women probably grind like crazy to hip-hop. I’d like to know more but thats what I imagine.

C: What do you think about mp3?
B: Mp3 has changed the face of music. Some people hat it. I enjoy it. It brings more artist to the table and its help blossom an entire new underground rap scene. I welcome the change.

C: And about women in hip-hop?
B: I welcome them too. Id like to be a female rap artists groupie–hehe

C: Have you performed live?
B: Over 100 shows in 3 years. Including opening for 50 Cent, Slick Rick, Mc Breed. I have done shows with Eminem, Royce 5-9, members of D-12, and a host of others. Last year I hosted the 2002 Detroit Hip-hop Awards.

C: Who is the artist you like most and why?
B: Ice-T. I love controversy.

C: Do you think that hip-hop videos represent the real hip-hop?
B: No. I hate sell out, glamourized, top 40 rap. It sickens me.

C: In which way you live hip-hop?
B: I been living it since the conception of modern day rhymin’. I was a witness to the pioneers of rap. the days of NWA, The DOC, Rakim, and others. I wasnt much of a tru early followering when Kurtis Blow was out and the Sugar Hill Gang I think I may have been a bit to young to appreciate them. But It has been a part of me since I was a kid. I remember going to Greektown as a kid (in downtown Detroit) and I would see all the hustlers with their patten leather forums and I was like–that’s whats up. I grew up hip-hop and as a young adult, turned into hip-hop by way of rappin in the streets…

C: Tell me something about clubs and radios in your city.
B: There are some college stations in Michigan that show great support to local musicians. But the two biggest radio stations in Detroit play urban top 40 garbage rap like Gay-z and other shit. The clubs are tight. i think Detroit has some of the best clubs in the world. Theyre just not hip-hop clubs though.

C: Future projects
B: The release of Blow Me has exhausted my will. But I have alreayd started on an underground project tentatively called “Backpeddlin’” where I will be dropping 30 tracks on one album and releasing free to the public via bootlegs and the internet.

kingpin@detroitrap.com
313-378-7646
po box 510432
livonia, mi 48150

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Interview with Alan The Fisherman

7 Febbraio 2004 Commenti chiusi

ALAN THE FISHERMAN
By Ciobin

CIOBIN: A little history of Alan The Fisherman
ALAN: I was born in a log cabin on the panet Jupiter.

C: In which way this cd is born?
A: Through the combined efforts of myself and DJ Mizzicah. My last CD was about healing myself. This one is about healing others.

C: Tell me something about hip-hop in your city.
A: Hip-hop sucks.

C: Do you know something about hip-hop in Italy?
A: No, unfortunately, I’m still rather ignorant in that regard.

C: What do you think about mp3?
A: I hate the site shut down. It was a valuable resource.

C: And about women in hip-hop?
A: I love it when a woman can really bring it on the mic. It makes me sad to see that so many female emcees depend on their sexuality to compensate for lack of skills.

C: Have you performed live?
A: Yep. I’m on a national tour right now

C: Who is the artist you like most and why?
A: I like Batman, because he is focused on his mission… and he judo flipped Superman.

C: Do you think that hip-hop videos represent the real hip-hop?
A: I hate videos.

C: In which way you live hip-hop?
A: I believe in the power of hip-hop, and I breathe it from within. With each release, I try to add something to hip-hop, instead of just seeing what I can get out of it.

C: Tell me something about clubs and radios in your city.
A: Jiggy.

C: Future projects
A: Next album will be called “Salvation for the Dumb Masses.”

C: Thanks and hello to
A: Anjalovely.

For contacts: alanthefisherman@yahoo.com

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